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Snoring

What happens when you snore?
Common causes of snoring
Is it just snoring or sleep apnoea?
How you snore reveals why you snore
Lifestyle changes to stop snoring
How can your dentist help you stop snoring?
When to see a doctor about snoring

Snoring

What happens when you snore?

Snoring happens when you can't move air freely through your nose and mouth during sleep. It’s caused by a narrowing of your airway, either from poor sleep posture or abnormalities of the soft tissues in your throat.

Common causes of snoring

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Age. As you reach middle age and beyond, your throat becomes narrower, and the muscle tone in your throat decreases.

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The way you’re built. Men have narrower air passages than women and are more likely to snore. A narrow throat, a cleft palate, enlarged adenoids, and other physical attributes that contribute to snoring are often hereditary.

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Nasal and sinus problems. Blocked airways make inhalation difficult and create a vacuum in the throat, leading to snoring.

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Being overweight or out of shape. Fatty tissue and poor muscle tone contribute to snoring.

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Alcohol, smoking, and medications. Alcohol intake, smoking, and certain medications can increase muscle relaxation leading to more snoring.

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Sleep posture. Sleeping flat on your back causes the flesh of your throat to relax and block the airway.

Is it just snoring or sleep apnoea?

Snoring could indicate sleep apnoea, a potentially life-threatening condition that requires medical attention. Sleep apnoea is a breathing obstruction, causing the sleeper to keep waking up to begin breathing again. Normal snoring doesn’t interfere with the quality of your sleep as much as sleep apnoea, so if you’re suffering from extreme fatigue and sleepiness during the day, your problem may be more than just snoring.

How you snore reveals why you snore

It’s crucial to note the different ways you sleep and snore. Sleep positions reveal a lot, and figuring out how you snore can reveal why you snore.

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Closed-mouth snoring may indicate a problem with your tongue.

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Open-mouth snoring may be related to the tissues in your throat.

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Snoring when sleeping on your back is probably mild snoring – improved sleep habits and lifestyle changes may be effective cures.

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Snoring in all sleep positions can mean your snoring is more severe and may require a more comprehensive treatment.

Lifestyle changes to stop snoring

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Lose weight. Losing even a little bit of weight can reduce fatty tissue in the back of the throat and decrease or even stop snoring.

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Exercise can also help to stop snoring. Working out to tone your arms, legs, and abs, for example, also leads to toning the muscles in your throat, which in turn can lead to less snoring.

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Quit smoking. If you smoke, your chances of snoring are high. Smoking causes airways to be blocked by irritating the membranes in the nose and throat.

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Avoid alcohol, sleeping pills, and sedatives, especially before bedtime, because they relax the muscles in the throat and interfere with breathing. Talk to your doctor about any prescription medications you’re taking, as some encourage a deeper level of sleep which can make snoring worse.

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Avoid caffeine and heavy meals within two hours of going to bed, especially dairy products and soymilk.

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Establish regular sleep patterns. Create a bedtime ritual with your partner and stick to it. Hitting the sack in a routine way together can help you sleep better and often minimize snoring.

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Sleep on your side. Avoid sleeping on your back, as gravity makes it more likely for your tongue and soft tissues to drop and obstruct your airway.

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How can your dentist help you stop snoring?

Dental appliances, oral devices, and lower jaw-positioners often resemble a sport’s mouth guard. They help open your airway by bringing your lower jaw or your tongue forward during sleep.

When to see a doctor about snoring

Snoring can sometimes be a warning sign of a more serious problem. A doctor should evaluate someone who snores for any underlying medical conditions, other sleeping disorders such as sleep apnoea, or any sleep-related breathing problems. Call your doctor if you and your sleep partner have noticed any of the following red flags:

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You snore loudly and heavily and are tired during the day.

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You stop breathing, gasp, or choke during sleep.

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You fall asleep at inappropriate times, such as during a conversation or a meal.

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dentist bedale, dentists in bedale, cosmetic dentist bedale

dentist bedale, dentists in bedale, cosmetic dentist bedale